This month, our president, Mandy Arnold, spoke with York College students about self-branding. Need a few pointers?

Let’s start with some basic dos and don’ts:

1.) Dress for the job you want, and know the culture of your prospective employer. Below are a few great options (for men and women) if coming to interview with us, but you may choose something more formal for a law firm or insurance agency.

Men

Women

Be smart about clothes that reveal too much. You want to be unforgettable for your skills, not your sultry side.

2.) Be cautious of what you have on ALL social media outlets. Certain pictures or comments made could cost you the job! We often think about these platforms coming
out of college, but being careful on social media is an important lesson that reaches into adulthood as well. Expect to be judged based on the persona you put forth — after all, that’s your brand.

3.) Obtain a professional sounding email. Gmail and Yahoo and many others are COMPLETELY free to use. (So no excuses, FluffyBunny1991@aol.com.) An inexpensive domain name is another option to further promote your brand, if you own your own company or business.

4.) Be prepared to demonstrate your past successes. Whether it be in a conversation about a recent work project or expressed through a professional design portfolio, others will appreciate a proven track record. (In case you need a bit of inspiration, designers.)

5.) Do your research, and come with questions. When the interviewer says, “We’d like to give you the floor, do you have any questions for us?” be prepared! You’ll demonstrate your ability to contribute and think critically, skills that can apply to variety of situations.

6.) Rejection is going to happen; even some of the greats were told they wouldn’t get very far at one point. This doesn’t mean you stop trying. Get back on that hypothetical horse and keep pushing forward!

Though these pointers are geared toward the job seeker, they’re imperative when representing a business as well. Always remember, you are your own business. If you want people to believe in your company, you first need them to believe in you and your brand.